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Grow Your Business Technology

Smart Hiring: Useful Tech Tools for Recruiting

image for BlueSkyImage/Shutterstock
BlueSkyImage/Shutterstock

You would think that hiring in the digital age would be easier, right? Post the job on a website, collect some resumes, put resumes through an automated system that looks for certain keywords, interview, hire, done. But it's actually more in-depth than that. Posting a job and hiring new employees is an opportunity for employers to showcase who the company really is and what it stands for. If you want the best talent, you have to put your best self out there. Keep reading for detailed insight on useful tech tools for smart hiring.

If you want to recruit the best talent, people need to know who your company is. If you don't put time and effort into creating an attractive and interesting brand, people won't want to apply, no matter how good the salary or benefits are.

Company branding is "an increasingly important part of the recruitment process, as the modern job seeker wants to know as much as possible about the company they're going to work for," said Zoe Morris, president of Frank Recruitment Group. "As a recruitment firm, having a strong brand presence both online and offline is vital to building trust."

Morris said looking for the right employer has become a personal investment. "Workers want to contribute to a culture and ethos that matches their beliefs and outlook. Paying the most money is no longer enough to ensure that you can attract the best candidates."

Zach Gale, director of special projects for Aegis HCCP, said the current job market favors the candidate, which means workers are only switching jobs when given the opportunity to join a company they really want to work for.

Having a solid brand will help your company break through to those candidates who aren't necessarily active job seekers but would make the switch for the right job at the right company.

Branding starts with your logo. It's the thing that potential employees will see and immediately know what your company is. If it's a good logo, it will even draw in people who have never heard of your company, making them want to know more.

"Having a good logo will help resonate your brand with your target recruit," said Kelly Andersen, marketing director at Wealth Continuum Group. "It should speak to them and have them be excited about the opportunity to join your team. Your logo is one of the first things people see, and it should make a strong first impression that mimics the rest of your messaging."

People respond to images more than text these days, even when job hunting. "However, having just any logo isn't enough to create a brand identity," said Pete Sosnowski, co-founder and head of HR at ResumeLab. "Only a carefully designed logo can adequately communicate with people and convey the company value."

A company website is a crucial part of employer branding. Candidates will see your logo there, which will reinforce the thought of your company is their minds. But when is the right time for a small business to launch a website?

"A small business should have a website as soon as possible," said Yvonne Cowser Yancy, HR professional and CEO of YSquare Advisors. "A website in 2019 is what a phone number was in 1984 – a basic expectation."

The good news is that creating a website is not nearly as difficult as it used to be.

"There are many inexpensive and free tools available to assist you with registering a website and creating a user-friendly vehicle that facilitates your brand development," Cowser Yancy said.

Sosnowski said that if a candidate can't find your company online, it doesn't exist to them.

"If you are just starting up and have not much success on your side, present the idea, company mission, and describe the company culture and company values on your webpage," he added.

These don't have to be separate websites, and usually aren't. Experts say you should create a page under your main domain for job seekers to review open positions and learn more about your company.

"This page, if designed well and packed with correct information, should instantly make a visitor want to apply and join your team," Sosnowski said. "Make the best of it."

You could also make a landing page for external job ads that directs visitors back to your main company page for more information, he said.

Your job openings should be posted on recruitment boards as well as your own website's employment page. You can post on industry-specific recruitment sites or try to reach the masses by posting on broader job sites.

"Niche recruitment sites very specifically target key skill sets," Cowser Yancy said. "The advantage of these sites is that they provide the capability to present an open role to people who are interested in your specific functional work."

On the other hand, she said, broad recruitment sites cast a wider net to introduce your company to more potential candidates. "They often aggregate other career sites, which gives you a broader audience to recruit from."

For example, Cowser Yancy said, if you post a position on Indeed.com, it will share your post across 100 or more smaller sites.

"With a wider net will come a significantly higher number of candidates," she said. "[But] high volume does not always equate to filling [the position] or quality matches for the role."

Whether you go niche or broad, you will need a job description that draws in candidates. How you write and post the job description can be the difference between finding the best, most interested candidates and finding only lackluster applicants.

"A job description should describe the job concisely and accurately," Cowser Yancy said. "It should outline all the required expectations and qualifications."

You should also think about the person you want to hire and tailor the job description to attract that person.

"The biggest mistake I see is when companies fail to take market demands into account," Morris said. "Making a conscious effort to ensure your wording is gender-neutral is an easy way to try and draw a more diverse range of backgrounds."

Include these elements to write a job post with the best chance of success: 

  1. A brief description of your company. This can include an overview of any work benefits or vacation time you offer.
  2. The complete job description. Make sure it's engaging!
  3. The primary contact for your recruitment website. This person will be able to log in, view resumes, and address any questions or concerns from the recruitment provider.

"The most successful job posts are engaging and written with the ideal job candidate in mind," Cowser Yancy said. "For ideas, surf a few recruitment websites and search for similar jobs. Identify what separates the good posts from the great posts."

Here are some recruitment websites for small businesses: 

What it comes down to is getting the best and most qualified talent to work at your company. But you also want that talent to be genuinely interested in your company and feel connected to it on a deep level. Knowing how to utilize tech tools for smart hiring will greatly increase your chances.

Jennifer Post

Jennifer Post graduated from Rowan University in 2012 with a Bachelor's Degree in Journalism. Having worked in the food industry, print and online journalism, and marketing, she is now a freelance contributor for Business News Daily and Business.com. When she's not working, you will find her exploring her current town of Cape May, NJ or binge watching Pretty Little Liars for the 700th time.