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How to Announce a New Employee

Julie Ritzer Ross
Julie Ritzer Ross

Sending out an announcement to your team each time you bring in a new hire can help make the onboarding process a smooth one.

  • An announcement email introducing a new employee paves the way for a smoother onboarding experience for the new hire and minimizes unpleasant surprises for existing team members.
  • You should email the announcement to your team several days before the person's start date.
  • Some key details to include in a new-employee introduction email are the reason for the new hire, the individual's starting date and qualifications, and tidbits such as their personal interests and hobbies.
  • This article is for small business owners, HR professionals and managers who are hiring or looking to hire new employees and need to know how best to announce the new hire to the company. 

Just as it's important to let your employees know when an employee is leaving your company, it's essential to inform them when you're bringing a new hire on board. It's best to do this by email and leave plenty of time for your team to get ready for the new arrival.

While this email doesn't need to be lengthy or formal, it should include some key details. If you are getting ready to bring on a new employee, this guide can help you understand the message you want to convey, who should get the announcement and when you should send it out.

Why it's important to announce a new employee

Your goal when you bring on a new employee is to make them feel like part of the team as quickly as possible. Failing to send an employee introduction email can lead to awkward first encounters between current and new team members. This is especially true if existing employees are so blindsided by the appearance of another worker that they worry about their job security. Forgetting or deciding against an employee introduction email is setting the stage for a rocky employee onboarding experience.

A properly timed and well-written introduction email gives your team time to process the news and prepare to welcome their new colleague. It minimizes potentially negative surprises, such as an employee finding out they have a new supervisor or department member on the day that person begins work. Just as importantly, it helps the new employee put their best foot forward and positions them for success. [Read related article: How to Welcome a New Employee]

Key takeaway: An employee introduction email is critical to a smooth onboarding experience for the new hire. It also makes the transition easier for existing team members, giving them a chance to prepare for the changes a newbie could bring.

How and when to announce a new hire

The most efficient and effective way to announce that you've hired a new employee is by email. This makes it easier to ensure everyone receives the message. If you do it in person, people who aren't in the office that day might not get the news.

A written announcement also allows you to easily share "fun facts" and details about the new hire so that existing employees can forge personal connections with them. The sooner these connections are made, the better it is for everyone.

You should send out your employee introduction email several business days before the new employee's first day of work. Again, this minimizes the element of surprise and the associated effects. Include the new employee in the email recipients so team members can respond with a welcoming note. Seeing responses to this notice on their first day will help the newbie feel like a real part of your company.

Key takeaway: Make your new-employee announcement by email and several days in advance of the person's start date.

Best practices for writing an employee introduction email

Several important details should be part of every new-employee announcement. There are also some parameters and options to consider.

1. Address the announcement to your entire team.

Part of the purpose of your employee introduction email is to ensure everyone has a chance to welcome the new hire. Even if recipients work in different departments, you want to give them a chance to help the new employee fit in and settle into their role. Existing employees can't do this if they aren't aware of a new hire in the first place.

2. Match the subject line, salutation and introduction to your company's culture.

Your company culture may dictate some parts of your introduction email. If you have a relatively formal culture, you should word the subject line and introduction of your employee introduction email that way. For example, the subject line could read, "New hire announcement," while the salutation might be, "Dear [your business's name] employees." The introduction could start by saying, "We're pleased to announce ..."

A more casual company culture calls for a lighter-hearted subject line and salutation. For instance, at Foot Cardigan, the subject line of every companywide employee introduction email is, "Warm Welcome to the Club, [person's name]!" The salutation is, "Hello Foot Cardigan Family," according to CEO Daniel Seeff.

You could also play on your company name or theme if it fits. Jonathan Roussel, founder of TheChampLair.com, typically kicks off his employee introduction emails by saying, "There is a new champ in the lair."

3. Cover the basics.

Include the person's full name, their start date and job role, and the name of their direct supervisor. Specify the department where they'll be working and their key responsibilities. It may also be helpful to highlight where the new hire's office or desk will be. Note whether the position is newly created and why (for instance, your business is growing or you want to bring a previously outsourced function in-house), or say which team member the new employee has been hired to replace.

You should also note the person's professional and academic achievements and provide their contact information.

4. Punch it up.

It's nice to personalize your announcement by including a few fun facts about the new employee. This could be a special talent, unique hobby, unusual aspiration, list of their favorites (book, television show, movie, food) or anything similar that will help to spark conversations and connections with existing staff.

Some of the business owners we spoke to give new employees a questionnaire for these facts. Others ask the person to write a sentence or two to help their colleagues get to know them better.

5. Don't go overboard.

Less is more in an employee introduction email. Aim for a maximum of 300 to 400 words. [Read related article: The Dos and Don'ts of Professional Emails] 

6. Close with a welcome – and an invitation.

Finish up by saying how excited or pleased you are to welcome the new hire and that you're sure your team will be as well. If applicable, mention that there will be a welcome lunch, happy hour (virtual or in person), or similar event to introduce the new hire personally. Encourage your team to take time to introduce themselves to the new hire when they start.

7. Attach a photo.

A photo of the new hire, such as their professional headshot, in an employee introduction announcement lets employees put a face to the name. If your company operates remotely and holds video calls, it also eliminates questions about unfamiliar faces on employees' computer screens.

Key takeaway: Send your employee introduction email to the entire company, with a photo if possible. In 300 to 400 words, provide the new hire's title, responsibilities, professional and academic achievements, and a few fun facts about them.

Templates for a new-employee announcement

Below is a template to help you craft an employee introduction announcement. Customize it by filling in the parts in the brackets and adding, deleting, or changing verbiage to fit your business's needs.

Dear [employees of your company],

We're excited to announce an addition to our team, [person's name], who will fill the position of [title] previously held by [predecessor's name], [OR] who is coming aboard because [reason for new position]. [Person's first name's] first day with us will be [starting date].

[Person's name] has extensive experience in [skills relevant to their new job] and is a graduate of [school or other academic achievements]. [He/she/they] [is/are] joining us from [previous employer's name], where [he/she/they] [performed job duty]. Before coming aboard at [previous employer], [he/she/they] [list responsibilities, if applicable].

[Person's name]'s supervisor will be [name]. As part of the [department or team name], [person's name] will [list job functions]. You can reach [person's name] at [phone number and/or email address] or just head over to [his/her/their] [office/desk] at [location, if applicable].

Please join us in welcoming [person's name]. [He/she/they] [is/are] excited to meet you, and I'm sure you will be too when you learn that [fun facts].

Please don't hesitate to contact me with any questions at [your contact information] – and join us at a welcome [event] at [location or URL] on [date and time].

Sincerely,

[Your name and title]

You can find other employee introduction email templates here.

Image Credit: Prostock-Studio / Getty Images
Julie Ritzer Ross
Julie Ritzer Ross,
Business News Daily Writer
Julie Ritzer Ross graduated from New York University in 1980 with a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism. A two-time recipient of the Jesse H. Neal Award for business feature writing and, she has covered a wide variety of B2B topics—from general business and technology to marketing and human resources—for a wide range of publications. Before becoming a freelance journalist 25 years ago, she held a series of editorial positions with several New York City and Northern New Jersey-based trade magazine publishers. When she’s not writing, she enjoys reading, travel, cooking and spending time with family and friends.