Lead Your Team Managing 5 Things a Boss Should Never Say

5 Things a Boss Should Never Say

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5 Things a Boss Should Never Say

It's easy for bosses to get close to their employees, especially at a small company. But, no matter how friendly or comfortable you are with your team, there are certain things you should never tell you employees. Here are the top five:

What not to tell: Confidential information. – Jeri Denniston,
Certified Strategic Management Professional for the Haines Centre for Strategic Management


"Never share anything told to you in confidence by one employee with any others. To do so destroys trust , is disrespectful of that trust, and ruins your ability to mentor and coach your staff," Denniston said.

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What not to tell: How wonderful you are. – Maynard Brusman,
consulting psychologist and executive coach at Working Resources


"Telling your employees how smart you are needs to stop. Employees view bosses who exhibit this behavior as arrogant and condescending. It undermines motivation, engagement and productivity," Brusman said.

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What not to tell: Disagreements with your superior. – Barb McEwen,
master executive coach and organizational strategist for 20/20 Executive Coaching Inc.

"A leader should never tell employees about any disagreements or personal issues amongst the management team.  To undermine one's teammates or your leader is political suicide.  Once the management team agrees in a certain direction, then everyone on the management team must be united in moving the vision forward," McEwen said.

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What not to tell: Do what I say because I am in charge. – Joel Garfinkle,
founder of Garfinkle Executive Coaching


"This is taking advantage of your title and level in the company. You can’t get your employees to do what you want just because of your title," Garfinkle said.

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What not to tell: Your personal ups and downs. — Tricia Scudder,
founder of
Executive Coaching Group

"To be an effective leader, you need to be able to put aside your moods, your doubts and the morning's argument with your spouse in order to focus yourself and your team on reaching the company's goals," Scudder said.

 

Chad  Brooks
Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.