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Grow Your Business Finances

6 Tax Checkups You Can Do Any Time of Year

6 Tax Checkups You Can Do Any Time of Year
Credit: Shutterstock

It is never too early to start thinking about your annual business taxes. Day-to-day decisions can have a significant impact on your overall tax obligations. Instead of being surprised at tax time, you should be planning throughout the year to make sure you're ready.

"When a small business owner plans for tax season strategically and consistently throughout the year, they can create a much better financial outcome for their company," Jamal Ayyad, vice president of service delivery for SurePayroll, said in a statement.

Regardless of the time of year, here are six "checkups" you can do to make sure you're ready for your next tax deadline.

In order to guarantee that your business is complying with guidelines that are constantly changing, plan regular reviews of documents and applicable rules, said Scott Augustine, a shareholder with Chamberlain Hrdlicka law firm.

Small businesses that are having trouble paying their payroll taxes may be able to take advantage of an IRS installment plan, Ayyad said. If you owe less than $25,000 in combined tax, penalties and interest, and filed all required returns, you may be eligible. Visit the IRS website for more details.

The Affordable Care Act, the IRS and the U.S. Department of Labor have rules regarding independent contractors or 1099 employees. Make sure your firm or organization operations are in compliance to avoid costly penalties and fees, Augustine said. [Editor's Note: Visit our sister site, Top Ten Reviews, for a side-by-side comparison of the best online tax software.]

Some states take loans from the federal government to meet unemployment benefits liabilities. Ayyad noted that if your state has taken, but not repaid those loans, there will be a reduction in the credit against the Federal Unemployment Tax Act tax rate. This means employers in those states will have to pay more. A number of states may be affected, including Arizona, Arkansas, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Kentucky, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Rhode Island and South Carolina, as well as the U.S. Virgin Islands.

This is especially important for those that have been written by attorneys outside your state of operation to avoid possible theft of important assets, Augustine said. As part of this, he also advised reassessing document-retention policies to make sure they balance exposure with business needs. This will help you avoid issues in tax matter and litigation, he said.

What would happen to your business if you had an unexpected health crisis or accident? Augustine said business owners should be discussing and determining what actions may need to be taken to ensure the firm continues on. There are also tax benefits to succession planning, so discuss with both your attorney and your accountant, he added.

Organizing tax records now can make filing taxes much easier and faster later on, Ayyad said.

"When small business owners get their information together well ahead of time, they greatly improve the odds of filing a complete and accurate return," he said. "Being compliant is the law, but instead of merely checking taxes off of a list of things to do at the end of the year, a savvy small business owner knows that preparation and planning ahead are key components of success."

Additional reporting by Chad Brooks. Some source interviews were conducted for a previous version of this article.

Marci Martin

With an Associate's Degree in Business Management and nearly twenty years in senior management positions, Marci brings a real life perspective to her articles about business and leadership. She began freelancing in 2012 and became a contributing writer for Business News Daily in 2015.