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Start Your Business Business Ideas

13 Part Time Business Ideas

Starting a business is no easy feat, but keeping it part time is a great way to ease into entrepreneurship.

Running a part-time business can help you earn extra money on the side or even give you the means to make the transition into a completely new career. Plus, starting a part-time business can be less expensive and a lot easier than you realize. If you're passionate about your business idea and willing to do the necessary research (including obtaining any necessary certifications), you can make your entrepreneurship dreams a reality.

Here are 13 business ideas perfect for aspiring part-time entrepreneurs.

Yoga teacher

13 Yoga teacher

If you're a yoga aficionado, you can turn your passion and skill into a part-time business by becoming an instructor. If you're willing to put in the time and effort to become a certified yoga teacher, you can teach classes at different gyms and health clubs. You can even run a mobile yoga business by offering to teach classes at local schools, businesses and other organizations. And if you eventually decide you want to start a full-time business and open a yoga studio, you'll have the certification and experience to do so. You can find out more about becoming a certified yoga teacher through the Yoga Alliance.

Photo Credit: LuckyImages/Shutterstock
Tutoring service

12 Tutoring service

Whether you're an academic or you have a special skill (like computer expertise or fluency in another language), it might be time to get into the tutoring business. First, figure out your target audience of students — for example, are you looking to help high school students with math, or teach computer skills to adults? Once you know whom you're looking to reach, start advertising your services. If your students are happy with the results, ask them to refer friends or other organizations that can use your help, and build up a clientele from there. Photo Credit: wavebreakmedia/Shutterstock
Hair Stylist/Makeup Artist

11 Hair Stylist/Makeup Artist

Beauty school isn't a prerequisite for launching a successful hair or makeup business. For those who can create masterpieces with a teasing comb and some hairspray, you only need a good reputation and client trust. Since beauty professionals often build their business through client referrals, Businessweek recommends working on friends and family for free or at a discounted rate at first. Once you have a solid customer base, you can offer competitive rates for updos and makeup for weddings, proms and other special events. Photo Credit: Salon image via Shutterstock
Software Trainer

10 Software Trainer

If you're proficient in a highly specialized software, you can get paid to pass your knowledge on to amateurs and professionals looking to expand their skill sets. Technical manuals are available for programs like QuickBooks and Final Cut Pro, but these are often expensive and difficult for the average user to get through. Schedule small group workshops or private sessions, and charge by the hour for a full tutorial of the program. Patience and a great personality are critical. Photo Credit: Pressmaster | Shutterstock

9 Handyman

Do they call you Mr. or Ms. Fix-It? Starting a part-time handyman (or handywoman) business is a great way to work with your hands, help people in your community and make some extra cash. A new handyman can put up fliers, advertise in local publications, and recruit friends and family for an online social media blitz. Then, you can get to work repairing everything from leaky pipes to faulty electrical wiring — just be sure you read up on the proper techniques and procedures, and check with your local government to make sure you have the necessary permits for any projects you might take on. Photo Credit: Tool Belt image via Shutterstock
Pet Care

8 Pet Care

Are you good with animals? Spread the word to friends and neighbors that you're available to watch their pets while the owners go on vacation or a weekend trip. Pet owners often feel more comfortable leaving their furry friends in the care of an individual rather than placing pets in a boarding facility, so getting referrals shouldn't be too difficult. If you can't commit to lodging animals in your home, consider starting a dog-walking, waste-cleanup or pet-grooming business.
Disc Jockey

7 Disc Jockey

While the term "disc jockey" might be a little outdated in the age of streaming music, there's no question that event entertainment is still in high demand. With your music collection, mixing software and your laptop, you can get people out on the dance floor at weddings and birthday parties, or simply provide background music at more casual events. DJ equipment is a big investment, but plenty of companies offer daily rentals of speakers, subwoofers and other accessories that you can use until you can save up enough to buy your own. Photo Credit: dpaint | Shutterstock
House Cleaning

6 House Cleaning

For working parents with long hours, cleaning the house can quickly fall to the bottom of the to-do list. Offer your weekends and evenings to these families, for everything from light housework, like vacuuming and dusting, to heavy-duty chores, like cleaning the kitchen and bathroom. Charge an hourly rate, or create your own service packages for a flat fee. Remember that your clients will be giving you access to their entire homes, so make sure you build up a trustworthy reputation with people you know before advertising to strangers.

5 Caricaturist

No festival or county fair would be complete without a caricature artist to draw fun, unique souvenirs for visitors to take home. With online tutorials like Learn-To-Draw.com, you can learn caricature techniques and begin building a portfolio to display for potential customers. Then, check your town or county's website for local events that have booths available to rent. Charge by the portrait at these types of events. (Depending on how quickly you can draw, the earning potential is huge.) And once you earn a reputation, you can offer a flat rate to be hired at school functions, weddings or children's birthday parties. Photo Credit: Dreamstime.com
Craft/Jewelry Vendor

4 Craft/Jewelry Vendor

Do you have a knack for knitting, jewelry making or creating other small crafts? If you can produce a large quantity of items in a short amount of time, consider selling your goods to the public. Online storefronts like Etsy are a safe place to start, since you can display photos of sample products and fill orders for them as they come in. However, if you have a large amount of inventory stored up, consider selling your work at a local craft fair or other community event.
Personal Trainer

3 Personal Trainer

Turn your passion for fitness into a lucrative, part-time job by becoming a personal trainer. Most clients schedule their gym time around work, so it's the perfect gig to have in addition to your day job. You'll have to put in time and money to get certified, but organizations like the Aerobics and Fitness Association of America offer online certification programs that you can complete at your own pace. Once you're a certified trainer, you can look for openings at local gyms or work one-on-one with clients at their homes. Photo Credit: Kzenon | Shutterstock
Music Teacher

2 Music Teacher

For the musically gifted, offering lessons to others who want to learn how to play an instrument can be a great source of extra income. Unless you're teaching piano, students can bring their own instruments to your home for hourlong lessons. Stock up on sheet music or songbooks in varying genres, and aimed at various skill levels, so you can offer a wide selection for your potential clients. Voice lessons can also bring in a lot of money if you market yourself to local high school and community theater groups. Photo Credit: SpeedKingz/Shutterstock

1 Bookkeeper

Most small businesses don't have a full-time accountant, so the task of record keeping often falls to the business owner. A highly organized, trustworthy, part-time bookkeeper can really alleviate the stress of sorting through receipts and tax returns. You'll most likely only need to put in one or two days a month for each client, depending on how many sales and expenses they have. Knowledge of QuickBooks is a plus, but not necessarily a requirement for, this side business. And if you don't already have a relevant degree, you can take bookkeeping classes at a local community college. You can also become a certified bookkeeper through organizations like the National Association of Certified Professional Bookkeepers.

Updated on Aug. 14, 2015. Business News Daily Staff Writer Brittney Helmrich also contributed to this story.

Photo Credit: kurhan/Shutterstock
Nicole Fallon
Nicole Fallon

Nicole Fallon received her Bachelor's degree in Media, Culture and Communication from New York University. She began freelancing for Business News Daily in 2010 and joined the team as a staff writer three years later. She currently serves as the assistant editor. Reach her by email, or follow her on Twitter.