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Looking for Work? The 20 Fastest Growing Industries

Looking for Work? The 20 Fastest Growing Industries
Credit: Garagestock/Shutterstock

With job growth on the rise, those looking for work should have a lot of opportunities to choose from in the coming years, according to new data from Economic Modeling Specialists Intl., CareerBuilder's labor market analysis arm.

The electronic shopping and translation and interpretation services industries are expected to lead the way in adding jobs over the next five years. Electronic shopping jobs are expected to increase by 32 percent, with the number of translation jobs predicted to grow by 28 percent.

Overall, the United States is projected to create about 7.2 million jobs between 2016 and 2021, a 4.6 percent increase.

Matt Ferguson, CEO of CareerBuilder, said that based on historical trends and the current hiring situation, nearly 1 in 3 industries are projected to add jobs at a rate that exceeds the national average. [See Related Story: 25 Best Jobs for Work-Life Balance]

"The growth will be broad-based, covering everything from IT services and developmental therapies to conservation, investment management, online shopping and sports instruction," Ferguson said in a statement. "When growth extends across a wide variety of industries, it's a good indicator of stability and strength in the labor market."

The industries that are projected to add at least 10,000 jobs and experience at least 15 percent growth in employment over the next five years are:

  • Electronic shopping – 79,919 jobs added; 32 percent increase.
  • Translation and interpretation services – 10,547 jobs added; 28 percent increase.
  • Offices of physical, occupation and speech therapists, and audiologists – 92,217 jobs added; 25 percent increase.
  • Home health care services – 348,424 jobs added; 24 percent increase.
  • Continuing-care retirement communities – 112,901 jobs added; 24 percent increase.
  • Telemarketing bureaus – 97,212 jobs added; 20 percent increase.
  • Marketing consulting services – 57,491 jobs added; 20 percent increase.
  • Environment, conservation and wildlife organizations – 11,833 jobs added; 19 percent increase.
  • Computer system design services – 183,682 jobs added; 19 percent increase.
  • Nail salons – 26,987 jobs added; 19 percent increase.
  • Portfolio management – 40,740 jobs added; 18 percent increase.
  • Psychiatric and substance abuse facilities – 21,045 jobs added; 18 percent increase.
  • Pet care (except veterinary) services – 17,907 jobs added; 18 percent increase.
  • Employment placement agencies – 49,283 jobs added; 18 percent increase.
  • Administrative management and general management consulting services – 113,746 jobs added; 18 percent increase.
  • Grant-making foundations – 10,991 jobs added; 17 percent increase.
  • Ambulance services – 32,042 jobs added; 17 percent increase.
  • Warehouse clubs and supercenters – 250,175 jobs added; 17 percent increase.
  • Internet publishing and broadcasting and web search portals – 31,669 jobs added; 16 percent increase.
  • Sports and recreation instruction – 26,238 jobs added; 15 percent increase.

The study was based on data from more than 90 national and state employment resources.

Chad  Brooks
Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.