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Lead Your Team Leadership

Leadership Lessons: Trust Your People and Question Your Assumptions

Leadership Lessons: Trust Your People and Question Your Assumptions

There's no one "right" way to lead a business. Today's leaders have a lot of wisdom to impart about managing the modern workforce, because each one approaches leadership in his or her own unique way. Every week, Business News Daily will share a leadership lesson from a successful business owner or executive.

  • The leader: David Rogier, CEO and co-founder of MasterClass
  • Time in current position: 2 years
  • David's philosophy: "Great people demand autonomy. They force you to question your own assumptions, and to admit something entrepreneurs find very difficult: I'm wrong most of the time." (Click to tweet)

Great mentors are so rare. I've had many throughout my career who have taught me valuable lessons:

Trust great people. I learned a tremendous amount from Michael Dearing, one of the best early stage investors in Silicon Valley. His approach is to find amazing founders and trust them. As an investor you'll never know as much about the business as the entrepreneur does, so it's crucial to find smart ones; they'll make great decisions.

Always get input from users. Larry Cheng, Diego Rodriquez, Chris Flink and Dave Blakely at IDEO taught me that users will always know more than you do. If you are designing the future of blow-dryers, talk to people who actually blow dry their hair. We've used this approach to help make our classes at MasterClass.

Let data guide your decisions. Mark Williamson at Restore Health has figured out how to let data, not ego, dictate his decisions. That seems easy, but it's not. To do it, you have to build your identity around making good decisions, not having the right answers.

I'm still learning every day from these people.

Edited for length and clarity by Nicole Fallon Taylor.