1. Business Ideas
  2. Business Plans
  3. Startup Basics
  4. Startup Funding
  5. Franchising
  6. Success Stories
  7. Entrepreneurs
  1. Sales & Marketing
  2. Finances
  3. Your Team
  4. Technology
  5. Social Media
  6. Security
  1. Get the Job
  2. Get Ahead
  3. Office Life
  4. Work-Life Balance
  5. Home Office
  1. Leadership
  2. Women in Business
  3. Managing
  4. Strategy
  5. Personal Growth
  1. HR Solutions
  2. Financial Solutions
  3. Marketing Solutions
  4. Security Solutions
  5. Retail Solutions
  6. SMB Solutions
Product and service reviews are conducted independently by our editorial team, but we sometimes make money when you click on links. Learn more.
Start Your Business Startup Funding

Traditional Bank Loans Still Pose Challenge for Small Businesses

Traditional Bank Loans Still Pose Challenge for Small Businesses
Credit: RawPixel/Shutterstock

While the ability of small businesses to obtain capital has improved in recent years, getting a traditional bank loan is still a tough obstacle, a new study finds.

Research from Pepperdine University's Graziadio School of Business and Management and Dun & Bradstreet revealed that over the last four years, there has been a 13 percent increase in access to capital for small businesses. However, most are getting that money from personal assets and not banks or online lenders.

The study revealed that only 38 percent of small business respondents qualified for a bank loan within the last three months, compared with 70 percent of mid-size businesses. While that's up from 30 percent in the first quarter of the year, it is down from a four-year high of 46 percent in the third quarter of 2014.

It's been even tougher to obtain a Small Business Administration Loan. Just 1 percent of the small businesses surveyed qualified for an SBA loan over the past three months. [See Related Story: Best Alternative Small Business Loans 2016]

Editor's Note: Looking for information on business loans? Fill in the questionnaire below, and you will be contacted by alternative lenders ready to discuss your loan needs.  

buyerzone widget

When it comes to alternative lenders, small businesses had the most success with merchant cash advances. The research found that 41 percent of the small businesses surveyed were able to obtain a merchant cash advance, compared with just 20 percent who were able to get a regular loan from an alternative lender.

Most small business owners are relying on their own personal assets to help fund their business. Specifically, more than 70 percent of those surveyed used personal savings, 45 percent used personal credit cards and 19 percent used cash from the sale of personal assets.

 Crowdfunding is growing increasingly popular with small businesses. The research found that 19 percent of small businesses that sought financing in the past three months used crowdfunding as a funding source, compared with just 7 percent of mid-size businesses.

Jeff Stibel, vice chairman of Dun & Bradstreet, said when they began conducting these studies four years ago, small businesses were reeling from the effects of the Great Recession.

"Since then, we have seen steady progress for small businesses being able to acquire the capital they need, although the financing is still predominantly not coming through traditional lenders," Stibel said in a statement. "It will be interesting to see how the new option of crowdfunding will affect small businesses, as our study has shown more eagerness to use that option as compared to their mid-sized counterparts." 

Although access to capital improved over the past three months, the number of small businesses needing it declined. Overall, demand for capital from small businesses dropped from 38 percent in the first quarter of the year, to 32 percent in the second quarter.

Of those the small businesses that didn't try to access capital over the past three months, 49 percent said it was because they had enough cash flow in place, while 24 percent indicated they already had sufficient financing. However, 16 percent didn't apply for financing because they were worried they would be rejected, 12 percent shied away because of the weak economy and 7 percent said they were holding out for cheaper financing rates.

"Business borrowing habits suggest owners may not see a need for an immediate infusion of capital," said Craig Everett, an assistant professor of finance and director of the Pepperdine Private Capital Markets Project. "However, these findings suggest business owners are still feeling the lasting impact of the recent recession and remain skittish about the future, as reflected in an abundance of caution when it comes to the economic environment."

Despite the lower demand, the data indicates there could be a spike in the need for capital in the second half of the year. The research shows that 56 percent of small business said they likely would seek financing in the next six months for planned growth or expansion.

The research is a quarterly indicator produced by the Graziadio School of Business and Management at Pepperdine, with the support of Dun & Bradstreet. The current data is based on surveys 1,097 small and mid-size businesses.

Editor's Note: Looking for information on business loans? Fill in the questionnaire below, and you will be contacted by alternative lenders ready to discuss your loan needs.  

buyerzone widget
Chad  Brooks
Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.