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Build Your Career Get the Job

Is Your Resume a Turn-Off? Recruiters Say Yes!

Is Your Resume a Turn-Off? Recruiters Say Yes!
Credit: PathDoc/Shutterstock

The majority of job seekers aren't using their resumes to paint themselves in the best light, new research finds.

Three quarters of human resources professionals say one of the reasons they're having trouble finding qualified candidates for their open positions is because of poor resumes, according to a study from the career network Beyond.

Overall, 73 percent of the HR pros surveyed believe job candidates are doing a bad job of tailoring their resume to the specific position they're applying for, and less than 30 percent of job seekers say they always customize their resumes to a specific job.

That means the majority of candidates are not taking advantage of the opportunity to highlight their most relevant experiences and to prove to employers that they are worthy of an interview, the study's authors said. 

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Further underlining their need to alter the way in which they present themselves to employers through their resumes, many of those looking for work aren't sure whether hiring managers are looking for their hard skills, such as degrees and technical training, or their soft skills, like communication and teamwork, according to the research.

The study revealed that while hard skills will get candidates in the door, it's their soft skills that will get them the job. Nearly 70 percent of the HR professionals surveyed look at hard skills first when searching for candidates. Fifty-six percent, however, said that the most important abilities in a new hire — and those that often get them the job — are soft skills, especially interpersonal relations.

"There’s no secret password for getting hired, however, job seekers can increase their chances by highlighting hard skills in their resumes and demonstrating soft skills during the interview process," Beyond's vice president of marketing, JoeWeinlick, said in a statement. "Many job seekers have the right ingredients; now they need to put them in the right order."

The study was based on surveys of nearly 4,000 job seekers and human resources professionals.

Originally published on Business News Daily

Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.