Unhappy Workers Name Their Biggest Complaints Credit: Unhappy employees image via Shutterstock

The discontent U.S. workers have for their job has many looking for new opportunities.

Overall, nearly 20 percent of Americans are unhappy at work, with more than 60 percent having considered quitting their jobs, according to new research from Rasmussen College.

The study revealed a number of reasons why employees are contemplating finding something better. More than half said they have thought about leaving their job because they don't get paid enough, while 31 percent said a lack of advancement has them thinking about new employment possibilities.

Additionally, 26 percent feel unfulfilled in their current situation, 24 percent think their position brings them too much stress, 21 percent aren't able to use their education or skills on the job and 20 percent want more of an opportunity to climb the corporate ladder.

Researchers attribute one possible reason for such overall dissatisfaction is that people's jobs are not in line with the career path they planned to follow. While having a clear career path is important to 71 percent of employees, just 24 percent feel they're doing what they set out to.

"Having a clear career path from the very beginning is critical so you don't end up stuck in a job outside of your skill set or lack of advancement opportunities," said Tamryn Hennessy, vice president of career services at Rasmussen College

While workers may long for a better job situation, there are several concerns holding them back. The research discovered that 35 percent of employees don't want to pursue a new job because they're afraid of losing financial security, while 25 percent are scared they'll regret their decision. In addition, 16 percent feel they don't have the right skills or education to move on.

"We know starting a career or leaving a job and starting a new one can be a nerve-wracking experience," Hennessy said. "At the same time, we see in our graduates every day how rewarding it is to pursue a career you're passionate about."

The study was based on surveys of 2,000 U.S. employees.