Startup Aims to Make Cooking with Cannabis a Piece of Cake Credit: Marijuana image via Shutterstock

Special brownies. Space cakes. Hash cookies. What do all of these aptly-named confections have in common? They all contain a key ingredient— marijuana. But beside their ingredient list, these edibles also share a common champion, the Seattle-based business MagicalButter, whose controversial kitchen utensil makes cooking with cannabis a piece of cake. 

MagicalButter has made quite a name for itself in cannabis and business circles alike with its one-of-a-kind product— a botanical extractor that pulls the nutrients from herbs and infuses them directly into butter and cooking oils. While the company's website states that its product was originally designed for use with grocery store herbs, it's no secret that MagicalButter also supports the use of its product for the legal consumption of marijuana.

In fact, MagicalButter's founder, 36-year-old Garyn Angel, said he got the idea for his business while helping a friend find alternative medicines to treat his Crohn's disease, a gastrointestinal condition that some studies indicate may be treated with marijuana. Rather than invent a new way for his friend to smoke or vaporize the herbs he needed, Angel decided to build a machine that would allow for the extraction of nutrients from these herbs for use in baking and cooking. [Crazy Companies: Bizarre But Successful Business Ideas]

The resulting machine, dubbed the MagicalButter, has since gone to market, where it has received "high" marks from some of the most respected resources in the marijuana world, including 420 magazine, TokeCity.com and Cannabis Culture magazine. With medical marijuana now legal in 20 states plus the District of Columbia, MagicalButter has also received rave reviews from patients who use the product to do more than just cure the munchies.

In an effort to spread it's love of homeopathic remedies, the company's charity, Cheers to Goodness, has donates money to families throughout the U.S., helping cover expenses associated with moving to states where cannabis treatment for diseases like Leukemia and Dravet Syndrome is available.

Originally published on Business News Daily.