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Grow Your Business Sales & Marketing

Mobile Email Marketing: 5 Tips to Get You Results

Mobile Email Marketing: 5 Tips to Get You Results
Making email marketing work requires thinking mobile. / Credit: Email marketing image via Shutterstock

When creating email marketing campaigns, businesses now need to consider their mobile audience more than ever before.

Dan Forootan, president of email marketing service provider StreamSend, said more than half of all email messages are opened on mobile devices today, and reading email is the most popular activity on smartphones, outranking even phone calls, he said.

"With that kind of penetration, reaching mobile readers can make or break an email marketing campaign, so businesses and franchise marketers need to make sure their messages are mobile-smart," Forootan said. [12 Email Marketing Mistakes to Avoid Over the Holidays]

To help businesses, StreamSend offers several tips to make sure email communications reach and touch the mobile user.

  • Make it easy: Since many consumers are doing other things, like watching TV, while checking email on their mobile devices, the messages have a tough battle to earn their attention and not get banished with an unsubscribe. That's why the top rules of email marketing are to make the emails easy to read and easy to act on via mobile devices.
     
  • Start small: Marketers should take the easier mobile route when they can. It's better to start building messages by first designing the mobile email experience and then working up to a desktop compatible version. Mobile designs are easier to expand than trying to retrofit desktop content. In addition, starting small with mobile designs can avoid scaled viewing issues.
     
  • Seeing RED: With Responsive Email Design, email designers create different layouts that will recognize and adapt to a device's screen or display size. Scalable design -- reducing content widths to any screen size – may seem like a better choice since it is easier to code and will open on all devices, but responsive lets designers modify content for optimal viewing on narrow screens.
     
  • Grab 'em while you got 'em: In mobile email marketing, businesses need to make it easy for viewers to act, and that often means engaging with them right then on their mobile device. With barriers like a multitasking reader, slow load times and a destination landing page that may not be small-screen friendly, marketers should focus on connecting with their mobile audience in the inbox, rather than always trying to drive them to another Web location. Share value with enough details, images and copy in the email to entice them.
     
  • Templates: Take advantage of well-designed, attractive templates that are ready to go. Mobile-responsive templates can let marketers get down to business right away while opening up some easy ways to add to the customer connection, such as with video widgets that will play in place and attach a call to action to it.
Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.