Twitter Tricks For Small Business Credit: Bird on chalkboard image via Shutterstock

Being active on Twitter can not only improve communication with customers, it can also boost a business's bottom line, new research shows.

A study by the social networking site revealed that followers don't just see a company's tweets, they also take actions after reading them that benefit businesses. Sixty-four percent of consumers share positive experiences about the businesses they follow on Twitter with their own network of followers, 70 percent spread the word about a business through retweets and nearly 75 percent are more likely to buy from a business they follow on Twitter in the future.

In a recent blog post, Russ Laraway, head of small and medium-size business at Twitter, wrote that just a single follower can benefit a business. Their research shows that 74 percent of people who follow small and medium-size businesses do so to get updates on future products, with 47 percent of followers more likely to visit the company's website in the future. [8 Facebook Tools Your Business Should Be Using]

"Each time you engage your followers, you create new opportunities for them to share content, make purchases or tell others about their positive experiences," Laraway wrote.

The positive impact extends well beyond the initial follower. The research shows that 70 percent will retweet a tweet from a small business because they like the content that is being shared, which opens up the business to gain an exponential amount of new followers. [See Twitter's Small Business Presenatation here]

Additionally, after interacting with a business on Twitter, 30 percent of followers are likely to include some of those communications in their own tweets.  That in turn will prompt more than 85 percent of their followers to be more likely to visit that business.

Laraway said one way small businesses can boost their exposure on Twitter is through promoted accounts. Promoted accounts are part of the "Who to Follow" feature, which suggests accounts that people don't currently follow and may find interesting. According to Twitter, promoted accounts help businesses drive purchases, leads, downloads, and signups; increase brand awareness and word of mouth sharing; and drive Web traffic.

"They also accelerate relevant follower growth, which means that businesses can leverage the value of their followers (greater reach, sales and recommendations) more quickly," Laraway wrote.

Business can learn more about promoted accounts, as well as how much they cost, by visiting Twitter's business website.

Originally published on BusinessNewsDaily.