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Grow Your Business Technology

How Much Time Do Smartphones Save? 22 Days a Year

How Much Time Do Smartphones Save? 22 Days a Year . / Credit: Smartphone Image via Shutterstock

Smartphone addiction may actually pay off in the long term: The convenience of smartphones and applications is estimated to save smartphone users a lot of time, a new study suggests.  

Overall, the research found that 97 percent of smartphone owners use at least one app on their device. On average, those smartphone users estimate app usage amounts to 88 minutes of time saved a day or 22 days of free time a year.

Email apps were the most frequently used apps, followed by text and social networking apps. Additionally, smartphone users said they used apps for games, Web browsing, weather, maps or GPS and calendar functions. Though email apps were the most frequently used, people saved more time using text applications than any other type of app. Text apps saved users an average of 53 minutes a day, compared with 35 minutes a day for email apps.

All that saved time adds up to an estimated $12,000 in productivity saved each year, which is calculated using the average wage of workers.

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"Given the world's massive immersion in mobile computing, it has been an eye-opening exercise to measure a facet of its influence on modern America — and, certainly, specific professions that rely on mobility to support job performance have the potential to derive an even higher dollar figure than $12,000," said Gil Bouhnick, vice president of Mobility at ClickSoftware, which conducted the research.

"As powerful as our survey results prove the smartphone to be, the exciting reality is today’s mobile technology innovation has only scratched the surface of its potential to propel success, both in personal life and in business," he added.

Smartphone users admit their devices are not simply for personal use. One in five users of GPS and email applications said they use those apps mainly for work, while one in three said they use them equally for work and personal reasons. Twenty percent of workers who use email apps said they are extremely productive when using those apps.   

"The trend of consumerization of IT is sure to make workers demand this productivity in their workplace," said Bouhnick. "As the lines continue to blur between work and nonwork mobile device use, organizations will seek out cost-effective solutions that empower their mobile workforce and enhance their bottom line while supporting complete workflows required in the enterprise market."

Even though consumers are spending all that time on their smartphones, most people do not think they are getting the most out of their devices, the researchers found. Eighty-two percent of respondents said they are not using all the features on their smartphones. 

The research, conducted by Harris Interactive, was based on the responses of 2,120 adults.

Follow David Mielach on Twitter @D_M89 . Follow us @bndarticlesFacebook or Google+. Originally published on BusinessNewsDaily.