Blair Cohen, Human Resources Generalist for GoHealthInsurance.com, contributed this article to BusinessNewsDaily's Expert Voices: Op-Ed & Insights.

Think the notion of offering your employees an unlimited amount of paid sick days is like giving them a personal invitation to slack off and abuse the system? If so, it's possible your company could be missing out on these benefits to the bottom line:

Less absenteeism

That's right — unlimited sick days actually result in less absenteeism. Employees that work for businesses which put a limit on paid sick days often feel as though they can't afford to be out of the office once they have used up their allotted number of days. As a result, they end up coming into work, spreading their germs and causing their coworkers to get sick and have to take time off.

Higher productivity

Nothing makes employees more motivated to succeed than a case of the Bird Flu, right? It's a simple fact that a sick employee is not going to be at his or her peak performance level. It's better to let them stay home and rest so that they can come back to the office with renewed vigor.

Eliminates the "use it or lose it" mentality

What do you do when you are given five sick days? You use five sick days because they were "given" to you. However, when there is no established number of paid days off, employees must rely on their own judgment and time management, which in turn, means they will most likely take less time off and only use what is needed.

It's good for morale

Unlimited sick days sends the message to your employees that you care about their health and well being. In addition, it shows that you trust your employees to utilize their time off for its intended purpose.

More efficient use of resources

While it is necessary to track unlimited paid time off for utilization purposes, the resources that need to be dedicated to managing sick and vacation leave are far less than those for strict leave policies with multiple "pools" of time. There is less reporting, monitoring and bureaucracy on a day-to-day basis and although due diligence must be done to avoid abuses, managers and HR can use this added efficiency to focus on an employee's overall impact to the company.

The views expressed are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the views of the publisher.