Build Your Career Office Life Older and Younger Workers Not So Different After All

Older and Younger Workers Not So Different After All

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Older and Younger Workers Not So Different After All

Millennial employees have more in common with their older peers than they might think, new research shows.

A study by from Randstad discovered that the age groups that share the most workplace sentiments in common are the youngest and oldest generations, with both generations expressing a more positive outlook on their careers than other demographics.

Specifically, the research found that nearly 90 percent of mature workers and 75 percent of millennials enjoy going to work every day, with the majority of both generations feeling inspired to do their best. Additionally, they also perceive a higher morale in the workplace than other age groups, with 69 percent of millennials and 64 percent of mature workers finding a positive energy at work, compared with just a 53 percent average among other generational groups.

Millennials and mature workers also have the same views on the skills most needed to advance their career. Both age groups ranked flexibility/adaptability, computer/technology proficiency and leadership as the three most important skills to growing their career.

Despite their similarities, there are some differences between older and younger workers, specifically when it comes to the prospects of working for another employer. The study shows that nearly 70 percent of millennials would give serious consideration to a job offer from another company and 47 percent would proactively seek out a position with a different employer. Conversely, just 20 percent of mature workers would consider making a career move this year, and even fewer — 12 percent — would look for a new job.

The age groups also don't necessarily see eye-to-eye when it comes to working outside of the office. Half of the millennials surveyed believe the blurring of lines between work and home has increased employee productivity, compared with just 37 percent of older workers.

Jim Link, managing director for Randstad US, said as the average age of retirement continues to increase, employers are not only seeing a wider generational gap amongst their employees, but they are also seeing more generations sitting side-by-side in the workplace than ever before.

"It is critical for companies to take note of the distinct characteristics, motivations and perspectives each cohort possesses, as well as the overlaps in attitude and workplace desires," Link said.

The study was based on surveys of more than 3,400 U.S. adults over the age of 18 who are employed full-time.

Follow Chad Brooks on Twitter @cbrooks76 or BusinessNewsDaily @BNDarticles. We're also on Facebook & Google+.

Chad  Brooks
Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.

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