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Build Your Career Office Life

Co-Worker Competition Similar to Sibling Rivalry

Co-Worker Competition Similar to Sibling Rivalry Credit: Arm wrestling image via Shutterstock

Few people get the competitive juices flowing more than co-workers, according to a new study.

The survey from Fitness Magazine and Yahoo! Shine revealed 43 percent of men and women are most likely to compete with their colleagues, trailing only friends and siblings.

Overall, the study revealed 45 percent of adults are most competitive about work. Andwhile 90 percent of adults would compete with a best friend over a job, the study showed men and women would go about it differently.

The study shows 20 percent of men, compared with just 12 percent of women, would lobby nonstop for the job, while more women than men would pursue the job in a more low-key approach.

Work isn't the only thing that makes Americans competitive. More than two-thirds of the men and women surveyed compare their performance with the person next to them at the gym, and love also gets the competitive blood flowing for many adults. Nearly 40 percent of men and women have at some point competed over a potential romantic partner.

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In general, women are more competitive than men in most areas, the study shows, including intelligence, athletic ability, work and money.

On the flip side, the research found that women are three times less likely than men to take credit for a colleague’s work. Only 4 percent of women said they would accept full credit for the job, while nearly 90 percent said they would give a co-worker some or full credit.

The study was based on surveys of 1,000 men and women.  

Follow Chad Brooks on Twitter @cbrooks76or BusinessNewsDaily @BNDarticles. We're also on Facebook& Google+.

Chad  Brooks
Chad Brooks

Chad Brooks is a Chicago-based freelance writer who has nearly 15 years experience in the media business. A graduate of Indiana University, he spent nearly a decade as a staff reporter for the Daily Herald in suburban Chicago, covering a wide array of topics including, local and state government, crime, the legal system and education. Following his years at the newspaper Chad worked in public relations, helping promote small businesses throughout the U.S. Follow him on Twitter.